Resources

Hostid is invalid

0

I have installed GAUSS 13 on RedHat 6.1, but the hostid information for getting my license comes up as “invalid.” What is the problem, and how can I get a valid hostid?

Tags: asked January 8, 2013

1 Answer

0

In RedHat 6.1, there was a change to the naming convention for network interfaces with a feature called BIOSDEVNAME.  Traditionally, network interfaces have been enumerated as eth0, eth1, etc.; RedHat 6.1 uses something different, so the license manager does not recognize the address and cannot display the hostid information.

There are a couple of options for this issue.  You can either write a rule to change the device name back to eth so the license manager can recognize your machine’s physical address, or you can disable the BIOSDEVNAME feature.

You can write rules in /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules to change the device names to anything you wish. Such will take precedence over this physical location naming scheme. Such rules may look like:

SUBSYSTEM==”net”, ACTION==”add”, DRIVERS==”?*”, ATTR{address}==”00:11:22:33:44:55″, ATTR{type}==”1″, KERNEL==”eth*”, NAME=”public”

Alternatively, you can disable this feature by passing “biosdevname=0″ on the kernel command line, in which case, behavior will revert to using ethX names.

Red Hat also had some further documentation here on the new BIOSDEV renaming:
http://docs.redhat.com/docs/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html/Deployment_Guide/appe-Consistent_Network_Device_Naming.html

Red Hat provides more in depth instructions on how to disable the network device renaming here:

http://docs.redhat.com/docs/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html/Deployment_Guide/sect-Consistent_Network_Device_Naming-Enabling_and_Disabling.html

Here is the context of the above link from Red Hat

To disable the consistent network device naming on systems that would normally have it on by default, pass the following option on the boot command line, both during and after installation:

biosdevname=0

The license manager in GAUSS requires a network device that is named ethX where ethX is the lowest numbered eth device (ex: eth0, or eth1). Using other naming conventions will not allow the license manager to operate properly and will result in further errors. The BIOSDEV will need to be disabled and the naming devices reverted back in order to obtain the hostid information and to have a permanent license issued.